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    Edy Poppy

    This month we speak to Norwegian author and artist Edy Poppy. Edy’s debut novel Anatomi. Monotoni. won the Gylendal Prize in 2005 and was recently published in English as Anatomy. Monotony. by Dalkey Archive. Tr. May-Brit Akerholt. Anatomy. Monotony. is available at Dalkey Archive Press, who will also publish the collection Coming. Apart. (containing the ‘Dungeness’ short story that we discuss)   More information about Edy and her writing is available at: https://eng.gyldendal.no/Gyldendal/Authors/Poppy-Edy Interview with Siri Hustvedt: Edy Poppy Talks Sex, Love, and Boredom with Siri Hustvedt Photo of Edy Poppy taken by Julie-Christine Krøvel Thanks to Edy Poppy and Katrin Meynarth at Dalkey Archive.

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    Samuel Fisher

    In episode 19 we speak to novelist, bookseller and publisher Samuel Fisher.  Sam’s debut ‘the Chameleon’ was published by Salt in 2018. You can buy the Chameleon here: Salt – the Chameleon As we mention at the beginning, there were some technical issues with the sound on one of the microphones in this episode – apologies, but it should sound ok if you’re listening on earphones/headphones. You can follow Sam on Twitter: @fishersamuk To find out more about the podcast, follow us on twitter @UnsoundMethodsor go to unsoundmethods.co.uk If you enjoy listening do add a review on iTunes.

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    Marc Nash

    In episode 18, we speak to Marc Nash, most recently author of ‘Three Dreams in the Key of G’, published by Dead Ink in 2018. Marc joined us in London to discuss choosing the playlist to write to, intense bursts of writing during the summer holidays, using the editing process to add material rather than remove, playing through language, writing across gender and plenty more. You can follow Marc @21stCScribe on Twitter If you enjoy listening do add a review on iTunes. Find us on twitter @UnsoundMethods

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    Eimear McBride

    Welcome all to the first Unsound Methods of 2019! This month, we are delighted to be joined for a second time by Eimear McBride. In episode 12 we spoke to Eimear alongside Noémi Lefebvre but we didn’t have much time to speak to them before that evening’s event, so Eimear was kind enough to come to the studio for a more extended chat. Among other subjects in this episode we discuss Eimear’s process, experimental fiction and the role of the novel in modern life. Thanks again to Eimear for her generosity with her time. If you enjoy listening do add a review on iTunes. Find us on twitter @UnsoundMethods

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    Christmas Special

    No guest this month (don’t worry, we’ve got more fantastic people starting again in January), but in this Xmas ’18 special edition Lochlan and Jaimie get tanked up on port and mince pies and conduct a brief dissection of how the first year of Unsound Methods has gone as well as a review of what they’ve learnt before getting stuck in to a couple of most commonly quoted lists of writing advice from Messers Vonnegut and Orwell. Full of the Christmas spirit, this episode contains many, many swears… Thank you to all of our listeners for a great first year, see you in 2019.

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    podcast

    Tom Lee

    This month we speak to Tom Lee award-winning short fiction writer and author of The Alarming Palsy of James Orr. We talk about Tom’s approach to writing and how he finds new ideas, the impact of ill-health on his writing as well as the difficulties in moving from short stories to longer form fiction. Tom’s work has appeared in The Sunday Times, Esquire and Prospect in the UK, The Dublin Review in Ireland and in Francis Ford Coppola’s Zoetrope All Story in the United States, among others. In 2012 he was shortlisted for The Sunday Times EFG Private Bank Short Story Award, the largest prize for a single short story…

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    Lars Iyer

    In this month’s episode we speak to Lars Iyer, weaver of fiction in blog-form, novelist and erstwhile philosopher. Among many other things we talked to Lars about turning blogs into novels (as he did with his first three novels ‘Spurious’, ‘Dogma’ and ‘Exodus’), his path to being a serial producer of trilogies and making the most of your spouse as your first reader and editor. Post-interview, Lars confirmed for us that ‘Nietzsche in the Burbs’ will be coming out next year on Melville House. You can follow Lars on Twitter: @UtterlySpurious – he also wrote an interesting piece for the White Review on the health of the contemporary novel in 2011, which…

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    Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi

    Welcome to the second series of Unsound Methods. In this episode we speak to Azareen Van Der Vliet Oloomi, the author of Call Me Zebra from Alma Books (in the UK). Azareen’s debut novel was Fra Keeler. Topics covered in our chat included research, working with editors and the paths that reading can take while putting a novel together. Thanks to Burley Fisher bookshop for providing us with the recording space for this episode. You can find Call Me Zebra here: https://almabooks.com/product/call-me-zebra/ And follow Azareen on twitter: @avandervliet Follow us @unsoundmethods or unsoundmethods.co.uk

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    Beyond Words: Noémi Lefebvre & Eimear McBride

    This episode was recorded at the Beyond Words Festival at the Institut Francais on Thursday 17th May 2018. We sat down with Noémi Lefebvre, the author of ‘Blue Self-Portrait’ (available from Les Fugitives: http://www.lesfugitives.com/books/#/blue-self-portrait/) and Eimear McBride, author of ‘A Girl is a Half-Formed Thing’ (Galley Beggar Press/Faber) and ‘The Lesser Bohemians’ (Faber). It was hot, and there was a lot of noise in the street, so the sound is not 100%, but we found it very interesting to speak to both writers about the similarities and differences in their approaches. We caught Noémi and Eimear just before they went on stage, so this is a brief chat. At times…

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    Olga Tokarczuk and Jennifer Croft

    This week we speak to Olga Tokarczuk and Jennifer Croft, joint winners of the Man Booker International prize 2018 for the translated version of Olga’s book Bieguni (Flights) We caught up with Olga and Jennifer two days after their win and discuss the whirlwind of prize-winning, composing constellation novels, suppressing your first published book, and the challenges of translating fiction. The superb ‘Flights’; is out now on @FitzcarraldoEds – https://fitzcarraldoeditions.com/books/flights You can find Jennifer on twitter: @jenniferlcroft Photo credit: Janie Airey